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Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink 

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via quentintortellini)

THE LAST LINE

(via covenesque)

This. I am tired of seing this numbers without thinking about woc. (via arobynsong)

and now, imagine the number for a Black Latina. i struggle w/even attempting to make that math work out b/c i think i’m trying to protect myself from what kind of harm that may bring to me at this moment, as an unemployed LatiNegra in the US.

(via latinosexuality)

(Source: fliponymous)

cryingalonewithfrankenstein:

This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1952 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have gender-affirming surgery.

Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says:

A World of a Difference

George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently.

This article is 61 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. While there are still some phrasing inaccuracies in this article, it makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that

When young women are sexually assaulted, we question their pasts and critique their clothing choices, yet rarely ask their attackers to simply be accountable for having no self-control, and no respect for the humanity of the girls they’ve violated.

When middle school girls post half–naked photos of themselves on Instagram, we vilify and ostracize them as cheap and easy, while ignoring the dozens of young men who mindlessly vote their approval each time, who feed the insecurity, and who perpetuate each degrading act with the click of a mouse.

When high school girls get jobs at chain restaurants, which require them to expose their body parts to strangers over trays of nachos, we bemoan their lack of humility and class, yet never question the thousands of men who fill these eateries every day; many with daughters the same age as the ones they ogle.

When women embarrassingly writhe on poles for a few sweaty dollar bills, in dimly lit bars ironically called “Gentlemen’s Clubs”, we heap insults and judgement on them, yet let the many married men who pay both the dancers and the mortgage each month, come and go without blemish or critique.

Sooner or later, we need to stop letting boys be boys, and we need to challenge them to be men.

Sooner or later, we need to pull them out of their perpetual adolescence and into adulthood, and ask them to evenly carry the weight of sexual standards.

Sooner or later, we need to show our young men that the they can actually raise the moral temperature in sexual situations, not reflect them.

John Pavlovitz, The Blurred Lines of Real Manhood (Robin Thicke, I’m Looking In Your Direction) [x] (via alittlepieceofsullivan)

If you’re asking yourself “Am I Bisexual?” then here’s a handy checklist:

1. Thinking about the people you’ve been attracted to, so far in your life, were they all of the same gender?

If you answered “No”, to any or all of the questions in our list above then we feel it’s okay for you to call yourself bisexual.

- Am I Bisexual? (The Bisexual Index)

I like the way this is phrased. “We feel it’s okay for you to call yourself bisexual”. Not “you are bisexual” because that takes away your agency in deciding whether that is true for you or not. A lot of “how to figure out your sexuality” guides do that, and I’ve always hated it. So it’s good to see this.

(via jadelyn)

(Source: thatmadgirl)

“If you blame Native American communities for their poverty, remember that the entire continent was stolen from them.
If you blame Black American communities for their relative poverty, remember that Black Americans were stolen from a continent, trafficked, and enslaved for nearly 300 years.
Tell me again about how your family ‘started from nothing’ when they immigrated. Didn’t they start from whiteness? Seems like a pretty good start.
The American Dream required dual genocides, but tell me again about fairness and equal opportunity. Tell me about democracy, modeled after the Iroquois Confederacy. Tell me your proud heritage, and I will show you the violence that made it so.”
— (via nativnuance)

via Kim Katrin Crosby 

Keynote Speaker for LGBTQ History Month at Dartmouth, on September 30, 2013 

https://www.facebook.com/kim.k.crosby

(via biggreenmicroaggressions)

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